Mental Health Conditions

getting help PTSD

Getting help for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Getting help for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 1200 900 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (07:41)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from PTSD

What types of therapies are involved?

Trauma-focused psychological therapies are important when treating PTSD. This can really help the child or young person to recover from the disorder. These therapies include trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. These will be discussed below.

Trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT)
TF-CBT is a type of talk-therapy that focuses on how we think and act towards traumatic memories and how this affects the way we feel. Research shows that it is an effective treatment for trauma in children and young people.

The idea behind TF-CBT is to help people to change the way they think about past traumatic events and to respond to these memories differently.

The child or young person will learn to process certain memories, manage flashbacks, cope with anxiety and work with personal meaning related to the trauma.

In the case of complex PTSD, this process might take longer to achieve. The therapist will also help the child or young person to deal with other issues that may be a barrier to improvement.

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing  (EMDR)
This is a specialized therapy that helps people to process and make sense of traumatic memories. It is appropriate for children from the age of 7 years or older and when TF-CBT has not been effective. Research shows that EMDR is an effective treatment for trauma in children and young people.

The idea behind this is that a lot of traumatic memories are not fully processed. Therefore it is helpful for the person to process these painful memories in a controlled way, that allows them to come to terms with the event.

The therapist will engage the child or young person to perform eye movements, tones and taps that allows them to think about painful memories in small chunks at a time. What they think and feel during these exercises might then be discussed with the therapist.

Eventually, the child or young person will have processed all parts of the traumatic event and this will help them to recover from the symptoms of PTSD.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of PTSD for children and young people. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists, doctors/psychiatrist and social workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will then treat PTSD in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

It doesn’t mean that one professional is better than the other. All professionals in this field go through intensive training before they begin to practice. In fact, when dealing with PTSD, counsellors and psychotherapists with experience in working with PTSD will likely be the ones to provide support.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that can be involved. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications for other conditions. Medication is not usually prescribed for PTSD in children and young people.

Psychiatrists: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. So they are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

Social workers: Workers trained in protecting vulnerable individuals might also be involved with the child or young person, especially in trauma cases such as domestic violence, neglect and child abuse. Social workers will provide support or will help to make arrangements for support. They will work to ensure the safety and well-being of the child or young person.

The journey of recovery from PTSD

The journey of recovery from PTSD can look different for each child or young person. This also depends on the complexity of the PTSD. But there are some things that are expected when going through therapy for PTSD.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the counsellor or psychotherapist will get a feel of what is going. The therapist might try to identify the severity of the PTSD, along with other important background information. At this stage, the therapist will need to ask many questions. This will help to create a full picture of what is going on and to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. 

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place with a time and regularity that suits the child or young person and their parents. An important aspect of the therapy session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to talk about their feelings and engage fully in the exercises. In cases of more complex trauma, therapy may take a long time before improvements can be made. 

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for PTSD, there will be progress and setbacks. This is because the child or young person will be learning to cope with very sensitive and painful memories, which is often disturbing. It is important not to feel discouraged when setbacks happen, as this can be quite normal when dealing with PTSD or any type of serious mental health difficulties. These situations provide opportunities to discover new ways to move forward together with the therapist.

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the child or young person and their parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to become confident in coping without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress or has completely recovered from PTSD. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist.

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the counsellor or psychotherapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have challenges with PTSD or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.  

List of useful resources

Post-traumatic stress disorder
To read our information on PTSD, you can click here to access the link.

What to expect in counselling for trauma
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful article on what to expect when getting counselling for trauma. To read more, you can click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.


Click here to get free advice from our experts

getting help with OCD

Getting help for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Getting help for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) 1205 898 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (06:43)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from OCD

What types of therapies are involved?

Psychological therapies are important when treating OCD. It can really help the child or young person to recover from OCD. The main therapy for OCD usually involves cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). This will be discussed below.

Cognitive behavioural therapy
CBT is a type of talk therapy that focuses on how we think and act and how this affects how we feel. There is strong research evidence to support the use of CBT for the treatment of OCD.

The idea behind CBT for OCD is to target the unhelpful thoughts and behaviours that keep the OCD going. The child or young person will learn to confront the uncomfortable thoughts and feelings until they are no longer a problem.

CBT for OCD usually involves a behavioural treatment, known as exposure and response prevention (ERP). Sometimes ERP is referred to as a treatment on its own. ERP is where the person learns to tolerate the intense discomfort of anxiety without reacting as normal. This can sound very daunting, but this treatment is well-known as an effective way to treat OCD.

When working with children or young people, the therapist might have parents/carers involved in the process. Parents might be asked to assist with different tasks outside of the therapy sessions.


What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of OCD for children and young people. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists and doctors/psychiatrist and social workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school, if they feel they need support with their difficulties. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk therapy is more in-depth. They explore the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will then treat OCD in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

It doesn’t mean that one professional is better than the other. All professionals in this field go through intensive training before they begin to practice. Also, many counsellors seek additional training throughout their careers.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that can be involved in the treatment of OCD for children and young people. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help to cope with OCD, especially if the OCD is severe.

Psychiatrists: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. So they are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

Social workers: Workers trained in protecting vulnerable individuals might also be involved with the child or young person. Social workers might provide support or make arrangements for the appropriate care of the child or young person.

The journey of recovery from OCD

The journey of recovery from OCD can look different for each child or young person. It also depends on the severity of the disorder. But there are some things that are expected when going through therapy for OCD.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the therapist will get a feel of what is going on. The therapist will identify the severity of the disorder along with other important background information. At this stage, the therapist will need to ask many questions. This will help to create a full picture of what is going on and to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. 

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place with a time and regularity that suits the child or young person and their parents. An important aspect of the therapy session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will allow the child or young person to confront the feelings of discomfort that forms part of OCD. The sessions might include activities such as talking, role-playing, exposure practice, completing worksheets, games and feedback.

Homework
This can be an important part of treatment for OCD. This is because OCD usually affects everyday situations in the child or young person’s life. So, homework tasks will really help the child or young person to practice what they learned in therapy. This will help them to develop a sense of achievement and mastery over the OCD.

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for OCD, there will be progress and there may be setbacks. For example, a child might not complete an exposure exercise because the feelings of anxiety may be too overwhelming. It is important not to feel discouraged when this happens, as these types of setbacks can be quite normal when dealing with OCD. These situations provide opportunities to discover new ways to move forward together with the therapist.

Ending therapy
The therapist will eventually prepare the child or young person and their parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to become confident in coping with OCD without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress or has completely recovered from OCD. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist.

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the therapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have challenges with OCD or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support. 

List of useful resources

Obsessive-compulsive disorder
To read our information on OCD, you can click here to access the link.

 Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder
To read the general information on the treatment for OCD, you can visit the OCD Action website. Click here to access the link. 

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.


Click here to get free advice from our experts

Getting help with ASD

Getting help for autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Getting help for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) 1300 867 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (08:35)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of managing ASD

What types of therapies are involved?

When managing ASD, there are many types of therapies that can be involved. These therapies focus on the child’s development and their ability to communicate and relate to others. This can include psychotherapy, applied behavioural analysis, speech therapy, play therapy, and occupational therapy. These will be discussed below.

Psychotherapy
It is common for people with ASD to have mental health difficulties. Therefore, talk therapies can be very helpful for them to learn to manage these issues. According to research, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talk therapy that can be effective in helping children with ASD to cope with anxiety.  

The idea behind psychotherapy for ASD is to help the child to cope better with mental health difficulties in a way that is adapted to their needs and characteristics.

 

The therapist will work with the child or young person to understand and learn the skills to manage their mental health challenges. The therapist might use games, their own special interests, pictures, technology and regular breaks to help them to engage.

 

Applied behavioural analysis (ABA)

This a type of behavioural therapy that focuses on learning and behaviour. Research shows ABA as one of the most effective early interventions for children with ASD.

 

The idea behind ABA is to increase the behaviours that are helpful and reduce the behaviours that are harmful or that affects learning. The therapist will target certain behaviours that are helpful by giving positive rewards when it happens. These behaviours might be related to the areas of play, language, communication, motor skills, self-care and learning.

 

Over time, the child will accumulate a set of positive behaviours that will help them to have greater success in everyday life.

 

Speech therapy

This is a type of therapy that focuses on helping the child or young person to develop language and communication skills.

 

The idea behind speech therapy is to improve the child’s ability to engage in spoken language, non-verbal language, signs and gestures. The speech and language therapist might help the child by strengthening the muscles of the mouth, improving sounds, forming words, matching emotions with facial expressions and understanding body language.

 

The child or young person will learn to develop their language and communication skills, which will allow them to be more successful in everyday life.

 

Play therapy

This is a type of therapy that focuses on helping the child to develop their social skills, language and communication through play time sessions. According to research, play therapy is effective in helping children with ASD to develop more social and emotional behaviours.

 

The idea behind this is to play with the child as they take the lead, which gives the therapist opportunities to initiate and encourage social interactions, develop coordination, the use of language and communication. This is also an opportunity for the child to expand their interests.

 

The therapist will use toys and games to prompt the child to do different things such as making eye contact, communicating their needs, understanding how to move toys and engaging in two-way conversations.

 

Play therapy is provided by trained therapists, who usually involve parents in play sessions and might coach parents to do it at home.

 

Occupational therapy

This is a type of therapy that focuses on the development of practical skills that encourages independence in the everyday life of the child or young person with ASD.

 

The therapist will help the child or young person with the skills that they may have difficulties with. This might include dressing, grooming, eating, using the bathroom, colouring, using stationaries and taking the bus independently.

 

Eventually, the child or young person will be able to do these activities without help and will live a more independent and successful life.


What types of professionals are involved?

The management of ASD usually involves a multidisciplinary team of professionals. This means that the child or young person will be assessed and treated by different experts. These might include counsellors/psychotherapists, clinical/educational psychologists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists, social workers and neurologists. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

Counsellor/Psychotherapist: In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Counsellors are trained in helping people with what they need right now, whereas psychotherapists are trained in helping on a more long-term basis. People with ASD might benefit from talking through their difficulties with these professionals. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors and psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

Clinical/educational psychologist: Clinical psychologists are trained in the diagnosis, evaluation of clinical history and specialized interventions for different conditions, including ASD. Educational psychologists are trained in psychological assessments and providing help towards learning for children in educational settings.

Speech and language therapist (SLT): SLTs are trained in assessing and treating problems with speech, language, communication, or eating, swallowing and drinking. The SLT provides specialized sessions for the child or young person with ASD to practice and develop the most effective ways to communicate.

Occupational therapist: These professionals are trained in how to help people to be successful in practical skills in daily life. They assess and identify helpful adaptations that may be needed, and they help the child or young person to achieve this.

Social worker: Workers trained in working with vulnerable individuals and the community might also be involved with the child or young person. These professionals might help to provide support for the family and make arrangements for interventions.

Neurologist: This is a doctor that specializes in diagnosing and treating conditions related to the brain and nervous system. Since ASD is a neurodevelopmental condition, it is possible that they might also see a neurologist.

The journey of managing ASD

When it comes to ASD, it is about management as opposed to recovery. This is because ASD is a life-long condition. The way ASD is managed can look different for each child and young person, depending on where they are on the spectrum. An overall journey through the management of ASD is discussed below.

Assessment

This is an important phase, where professionals will need to identify and assess the child, in order to confirm a diagnosis of autism. This might involve more than one professional who might administer specialized tests with the child and will interview parents to understand what is going on. Depending on the child’s needs on the spectrum, these professionals will provide or refer the child for therapy and specialist services.

 

Therapy sessions

These might include any combination of counselling, psychotherapy, ABA, occupational therapy, speech therapy or play therapy. Each therapy will aim to target certain goals that are specific to the child. Parents are usually highly involved in many of the sessions. The techniques used in some therapies are usually taught to parents for them to use at home. Sessions usually go on for many months or years throughout the child or young person’s life.


Progress and setbacks

When managing ASD, it is common for setbacks to occur. The difficulties associated with ASD can take a long time to change, so it is not realistic to expect the child or young person to improve quickly or without any setbacks. It is important to not get discouraged when setbacks happen. It is an opportunity for the child or young person, parents and the therapist to think about new ways to move forward.

 

Ending therapy

The professional will eventually prepare the child or young person and their parents for the end of therapy.

This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to develop more independence. This will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress and has reached their goals. The child or young person and their parents will leave therapy with many skills that they can use independently.

 

Follow up

There are usually follow-up meetings following any type of therapy for ASD. Professionals would need to assess whether the child or young person has maintained their progress. At this point, the child might have additional therapy sessions, depending on their needs.

List of useful resources 

Autism spectrum disorder
To read our information on autism spectrum disorder, you can click here to access the link.

Treatments for autism
The Autism speaks website has a wide range of resource on the management of autism. To read more about this, you can click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of psychological therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.


Click here to get free advice from our experts

getting help with ADHD 1

Getting help for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Getting help for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) 1200 943 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (07:24)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from ADHD

What types of therapies are involved?

When treating ADHD, there are psychosocial types of therapy that are involved. This means that the therapy aims to focus on the child or young person and the influence of others around them. This can involve parent/guardian training programmes and cognitive behavioural therapy.

Parent/guardian training programmes
This a specialized programme that helps parents to improve on their parenting skills, as a way to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. There is a lot of research that supports parent training as an effective treatment for ADHD.  

The idea behind it is that parents hold the key to stop certain symptoms from continuing. This is because parents are the ones responsible for the environment at home, setting boundaries, ensuring discipline and giving appropriate love and affection.

The parents/guardians will learn more about ADHD and develop good strategies to help their child with ADHD. For example, they might be encouraged to make changes to their communication, the way they interact with their child and the home environment.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)

This is a type of talk therapy that focuses on the link between thoughts, feelings and behaviours. With CBT, children and young people learn the skills to reduce symptoms of ADHD and manage mental health problems. According to research, CBT can be helpful in reducing behavioural problems linked with ADHD.

 

The idea behind this is that some of the symptoms of ADHD can cause problems in the child or young person’s life such as poor social skills, concentration and self-control. Therefore, by learning the skills that will improve these areas, the symptoms of ADHD will be reduced.

 

The therapist will help the child or young person to talk about difficult feelings, as they also learn skills such as social skills, problem-solving and listening skills. This will help the child to develop helpful strategies to cope with ADHD and mental health problems.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of ADHD. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists, educational psychologist, doctors/psychiatrist and social workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Counselling is focused on helping people with what they need right now. Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk-therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will help the child in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

Educational psychologist: Psychologists trained in the area of child development and learning might be involved in the treatment process of ADHD. They will help to support and improve the child’s learning experience, so that they can be successful at school.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help the child or young person to cope better with ADHD.   

Psychiatrist: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they specialized in the field of psychiatry. They are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

Social workers: Workers trained in working with vulnerable individuals and the community might also be involved with the child or young person. They can provide or make arrangements for support. They may also work with law enforcement and other sectors to ensure that the child is safe from harm.

The journey of recovery from ADHD

The journey of recovery from ADHD can look different for each child or young person. Depending on the child’s age and severity of symptoms, the treatment might include therapy and/or parent training programmes. An example journey through cognitive behavioural therapy is discussed below.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the counsellor or psychotherapist will get a feel of what is going on with the child or young person. The therapist will also identify important background information. They will ask some questions, which will help to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. 

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place with a time and regularity that suits the child or young person and their parents. An important aspect of the session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to talk and be open with the therapist. Sessions might include different activities such as discussing, role-playing, games, and feedback. 

Homework
This can be an important part of treatment, especially when having CBT. This is because ADHD affects everyday situations in the child or young person’s life. So, homework tasks will really help the child or young person to develop a sense of achievement and mastery over their difficulties.

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for ADHD, there will be progress and setbacks. Learning to improve self-control, behaviours and concentration can take a long time to change, so it is not realistic to expect progress without any setbacks. It is important to not get discouraged when setbacks happen. It is an opportunity for the child or young person, parents and the therapist to think about new ways to move forward.

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the child, young person and parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to become confident without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist.

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the counsellor or psychotherapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have difficulties or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.

List of useful resources 

ADHD
To read our information on ADHD, you can click here to access the link

ADDIS information on ADHD
To read more information on ADHD and treatments involved, you can go to the ADDIS information services website. Click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.


Click here to get free advice from our experts

getting help with bp

Getting help for bipolar disorder

Getting help for bipolar disorder 1300 867 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (08:55)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from bipolar disorder

What types of therapies are involved?

When it comes to bipolar disorder, medication is the first treatment that is given. However, there are some psychological therapies that can also be helpful. This can include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and family therapy. These therapies will be discussed below.

Cognitive behavioural therapy
CBT is a type of talk therapy that focuses on how we think and act and how this affects how we feel. Research shows that CBT is effective in helping people with bipolar disorder to have less severe episodes.

The idea behind CBT for bipolar disorder is to help the young person to monitor and manage the thoughts, actions and feelings that might make the depressive symptoms worse.

During the sessions, the young person will learn about bipolar disorder and how it works. They will also learn to spot certain warning signs for changes in mood. The young person will learn to make changes to the way they think about certain situations, as well as learn to problem-solve and develop social skills.

Eventually, the young person will develop their personal toolbox for coping with depression in a healthier way.

Interpersonal psychotherapy
IPT is a type of talk therapy that focuses on the young person and their relationships, as a way to manage the depressive episodes. Research shows that IPT is helpful for reducing depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder.

The idea behind IPT is that relationships are always involved in the course of depression. So by helping relationships to get better, the depression will also get better.

The young person will develop an understanding of how their relationships affect the way they feel. They will learn the skills that will help their relationships to improve. These might include communication skills, conflict resolution, problem-solving and other relational skills.

There is also a variation of IPT that involves focusing on the social rhythms in the person’s life. The therapist might also help them to adopt a regular daily routine that encourages discipline in areas such as taking medications, having a good bedtime routine, going to work and making social contact. 

Eventually, the young person will have improved their relationships and daily routine, which will reduce the symptoms of depression.

Family therapy
This is a type of therapy that focuses on the family as a whole, as a way to support the young person in coping with bipolar disorder.

The idea behind family therapy for bipolar disorder is to strengthen family relationships and the ability to work together to manage the disorder. This can help the person to recover from episodes more quicker and experience less severe symptoms.

The family will learn how to resolve conflict, improve communication and emotional bonds. By working together, they will learn to take helpful actions that will help to support the young person when they are having difficulties.

Eventually, the family will build a strong support network that will be responsible for spotting warning signs and encouraging the person to get the most out of their treatment.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of bipolar disorder in young people. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists and doctors/psychiatrist, mental health nurses, support workers and social workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school, if they feel they need support with their difficulties. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will work with bipolar disorder in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that are involved in the treatment of bipolar disorder. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help the person to cope. 

Psychiatrist: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. Psychiatrists will prescribe certain medications that will help with the episodes in bipolar disorder.

Mental health nurses: Nurses trained in mental health might also be involved. If the young person is in a hospital setting or is seen by a crisis team due to self-harm or suicide, a mental health nurse might help to give treatment by administering medication.

Support workers: Workers trained in helping vulnerable people to live better lives might also be involved with the young person. This might be within a community setting or a crisis situation. Their role is to provide emotional and practical support (e.g. helping parents to cope, helping with paperwork, making child-care arrangements).

Social workers: Workers trained in protecting vulnerable individuals might also be involved. This might be within a community or a crisis situation. Social workers will problem-solve and organise the right support for the young person to ensure their protection.

The journey of recovery from bipolar disorder

When it comes to bipolar disorder, it is about management as opposed to recovery. This is because bipolar disorder is a life-long condition. The way bipolar disorder is managed can look different for each young person. But there are some things that are expected when going through therapy for bipolar disorder.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the psychiatrist or doctor will first assess the young person. They will ask many questions, including certain questions about mania, depression and the possibility of self-harm or suicide. This will help to create a full picture of what is going on and to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. From there, the doctor might decide on a treatment plan that includes medication, psychological therapy and a crisis plan for the person.

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place on a more long-term basis. An important aspect of the therapy session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the young person and the family. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to explore their difficulties. The sessions will equip the young person and the family to understand and manage the episodes of bipolar disorder.

Homework 
This can be an important part of treatment. The therapist might get the young person and family members to practice certain tasks at home. Homework tasks will help the young person and the family to develop a sense of achievement and mastery in coping with bipolar disorder.

Crisis
The psychiatrist or therapist may have made agreements with the person on what to do if they experience sudden desires to self-harm or commit suicide, due to intense depressive episodes. For this reason, it may happen that other mental health staff will need to see them at their home or at the hospital to provide support.

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for bipolar disorder, there will be progress and setbacks. Even with successful therapy, the person might still experience some extremes in their mood. It is important not to feel discouraged when this happens, as this is normal when dealing with bipolar disorder. These situations provide opportunities to discover new ways to move forward together with the mental health experts involved in the treatment.

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the young person and the family for the end of therapy. The end of therapy will take place once the young person and the family has made a lot of progress and has reached their treatment goals. The young person and the family will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist.

Follow up
The young person will continue to see their psychiatrist throughout their lives. The counsellor or psychotherapist might schedule follow-up meetings to check how the young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have challenges, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.  

List of useful resources

Bipolar disorder
To read our information on bipolar disorder, you can click here to access the link.

Bipolar recovery
Bipolar UK offers some helpful insight on their website on what managing bipolar disorder can look like. You can click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.


Click here to get free advice from our experts

Conduct disorders

Getting help for conduct disorders

Getting help for conduct disorders 1200 900 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (08:23)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from conduct disorders

What types of therapies are involved?

When treating conduct disorders, there are psychosocial types of therapy that are involved. This means that the therapy aims to focus on the child or young person and the influence of others around them. Therefore, besides from having family therapy and child-focused programmes, the child or young person and their parent/guardian might also go through parent training and multimodal programmes. These will be discussed below.

 

Parent/guardian training programmes

This a specialized programme that helps parents/guardians to improve on their parenting skills, as a way to stop conduct disorders from continuing. Research shows that parenting programs can be very effective for treating conduct disorders.

 

The idea behind it is that parents hold the key to stop the behavioural problems from persisting. This is because parents are the ones responsible for setting boundaries, ensuring discipline and giving appropriate love and affection.

 

Other professionals aside from counsellors and psychotherapists can also deliver this programme. This can include social and community workers.

 

The parents/guardians will learn to adapt their parenting skills in a way that helps the child or young person to change their problematic behaviour. The child might be invited to some sessions together with their parents, where they will get to practice these new skills and get feedback from the professional.

 

Family therapy

This is a type of therapy that focuses on the family as a whole, as a way to treat conduct disorders in children and young people.

 

The idea behind family therapy is that problem behaviours developed because of certain dysfunctions in the family. Therefore, if these dysfunctions can be resolved, this will help to stop the conduct disorder from continuing.

 

The therapist will help to resolve conflict, improve communication and emotional bonds between members of the family. The ultimate goal will be to improve cooperation within the family in a way that supports the child or young person to recover from the conduct disorder.

 

Child-focused programmes

This is a specialized programme that helps children and young people to reduce their problem behaviours. This might also include CBT, which focuses on the link between thoughts, feelings and behaviours. Research shows that CBT is very effective for reducing problem behaviours that are linked with conduct disorders.

 

The idea behind this is that children and young people with conduct disorders think about anger and violence in a different way. For example, a young person might think that hitting is enjoyable. So, if they change the way they think about this, they will stop the problem behaviour.

 

The professional will help the child to come up with new ways of problem-solving without the need for anger or violence. They will learn how to cope with negative emotions and manage their anger. The professional will help the child to be more attentive to the consequences of their actions.

 

Multimodal programmes

This is an intensive form of treatment for children and young people with conduct disorders, where all of the above programmes might be given with the additional involvement of the school, the community and the criminal justice system. This might be organised by a professional, such as a case manager/social worker.

 

The idea behind a multimodal programme is to manage the child or young person’s behaviour in different settings, to increase the chances that they will recover from the conduct disorder.

 

The professional will make sure that the child or young person is getting therapy and their parents, teachers, members of the community and the criminal justice system are also helping to support the child.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process for conduct disorders. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists and doctors/psychiatrist and social/community workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Counselling is focused on helping people with what they need right now. Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school, if they feel they need support with their difficulties. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk-therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will then treat the conduct disorder in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

It doesn’t mean that one professional is better than the other. All professionals in this field go through intensive training before they begin to practice. Also, many counsellors seek additional training throughout their careers.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that can be involved in the treatment of conduct disorders. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help the child or young person, especially if there are other conditions that make the conduct disorder more complicated to treat.

Psychiatrist: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. So they are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

Social/community workers: Workers trained in working with vulnerable individuals and the community might also be involved with the child or young person. These professionals might help to provide parent training or multimodal programmes. They can make regular visits to the family home and provide or make arrangements for support. They may also work with law enforcement and other sectors to ensure that the child is safe from harm.

The journey of recovery from conduct disorders

The journey of recovery from conduct disorder can look different for each child or young person. Depending on the child’s age and severity of behavioural problems, the treatment might include a wide range of therapies and programmes. An example journey through a child-focused programme is discussed below.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the counsellor or psychotherapist will get a feel of what is going on with the child or young person. The therapist will also identify important background information. They will ask some questions, which will help to create a full picture of what is going on and to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. 

Therapy sessions
These sessions will be regular and long-term for conduct disorders. An important aspect of the session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to talk and be open with the therapist. Sessions might include different activities such as role-playing, games, rehearsal and feedback.

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for conduct disorders, there will be progress and setbacks. Problem behaviours can take a long time to change, so it is not realistic to expect the child or young person to improve quickly or without any setbacks. It is important to not get discouraged when setbacks happen. It is an opportunity for the child or young person, parents and the therapist to think about new ways to move forward.

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the child, young person and parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to become confident without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress or has completely recovered from the conduct disorder. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist. 

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the counsellor or psychotherapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to show problem behaviours or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.

List of useful resources 

Conduct disorder

To read our information on conduct disorders, you can click here to access the link

Recovery from conduct disorders

The Royal College of Psychiatry also offers information on what the treatment for conduct disorders might involve. You can click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy

The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to get free advice from our experts

depression

Getting help for depression

Getting help for depression 1200 900 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (09:31)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from depression

What types of therapies are involved?

Psychological therapies are important when treating depression. It can really help the child or young person to learn the skills to fight off the depressive symptoms. There are different types of therapies that can be involved. These can include but are not limited to: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and supportive counselling. These will be discussed below.

While other therapies can also be helpful, there is strong research evidence that supports the use of CBT and IPT for treating depression in children and young people.

Cognitive behavioural therapy
CBT is a type of talk-therapy that focuses on how we think and act and how this affects how we feel. CBT can take anywhere between 6-20 sessions, depending on the severity of the depression and the child or young person’s age.

The idea behind CBT with children and young people is that they get to talk about their feelings and learn new skills, which they can use to fight off the depressive symptoms. This all takes place in an environment of safety that the therapist is able to create for the child or young person.

The child or young person will learn how to manage the thoughts and actions that keep the depression going. With a young child, the therapist might focus on these by using stories, games, play and pictures to help the child to engage.  

The therapist always finds it useful to involve other family members in the process of treatment. This is because family members also play a part in influencing the child or young person on a day-to-day basis. So, if the therapist can get the family on board, there are greater chances of success.

Interpersonal psychotherapy
Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a type of talk-therapy that focuses on the child or young person and their relationships, as a way to manage the depression. IPT can take anywhere between 12-16 sessions depending on the severity of the depression and the child or young person’s age.

The idea behind IPT is that relationships are always involved in the course of depression. So by helping relationships to get better, the depression will also get better.

The child or young person will develop an understanding of how their relationships affect the way they feel. They will learn the skills that will help their relationships to improve. These might include communication skills, conflict resolution, problem-solving and other relational skills.

During IPT, the therapist always finds it useful to involve other family members. This is because relationships with family members are the most important relationships in the life of the child or young person. Some session of IPT will involve other family members as well.  

Supportive counselling
Supportive counselling is a type of talk-therapy that focuses mainly on creating a safe space for the child or young person to talk about their difficulties. It is different from the other therapies because it doesn’t follow a set of rules. 

The idea behind supportive counselling is that by simply providing a safe space for the child or young person to talk about and explore their struggles with depression, they will begin to feel better.

The therapist will provide encouragement, reassurance, advice and will mostly listen attentively. The child or young person can feel safe to let out the emotions that they may not be able to express with others. Within this safe space, the therapist will team up with the child or young person to think about helpful ways to move forward.

The therapist might also find it helpful to include other family members, especially if there is a young child involved. Other family members will also discuss ways that they can help the child to get better from depression.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of depression for children and young people. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists and doctors/psychiatrist, mental health nurses, support workers and social workers. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received. 

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Counselling is focused on helping people with what they need right now. Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school, if they feel they need support with their difficulties. Here at Mindsum, we have counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling but their approach to talk-therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will then treat the depression in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, we have psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

It doesn’t mean that one professional is better than the other. All professionals in this field go through intensive training before they begin to practice. Also, many counsellors seek additional training throughout their careers.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that can be involved in the treatment of depression for children and young people. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help the depression, especially if the depression is quite severe.

Psychiatrist: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. So they are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

Mental health nurses: Nurses trained in mental health might also be involved with the child or young person. If the child or young person is in a hospital setting or is seen by a crisis team due to self-harm or suicide, a mental health nurse might help to give treatment by administering medication.

Support workers: Workers trained in helping vulnerable people to live better lives might also be involved with the child or young person. This might be within a community setting or a crisis situation. Their role is to provide emotional and practical support (e.g. helping parents to cope, helping with paperwork, making child-care arrangements).

Social workers: Workers trained in protecting vulnerable individuals might also be involved with the child or young person. This might also be within a community or a crisis situation. Social workers will problem-solve and organise the right support for the child or the young person to ensure their protection.

The journey of recovery from depression

The journey of recovery from depression can look different for each child or young person and depending on the approach that the counsellor or psychotherapist uses. But there are some things that are expected when going through therapy for depression.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the counsellor or psychotherapist will get a feel of what is going on with the child or young person. The therapist might try to identify the severity of the depression, along with other important background information. The therapist will ask some questions,  including certain questions about the possibility of self-harm or suicide. This will help to create a full picture of what is going on and to know what type of treatment will be most helpful. 

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place with a time and regularity that suits the child or young person and their parents. An important aspect of the therapy session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to talk about their feelings. The child will be able to develop a better understanding of their feelings and learn helpful ways to tackle the depression.

Homework 
This can be an important part of treatment for depression, especially when having CBT. This is because depression affects everyday situations in the child or young person’s life. So, homework tasks will really help the child or young person to develop a sense of achievement and mastery over the depression.

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for depression, there will be progress and there may be setbacks. For example, because of the depression itself, a child or a young person might lack motivation and find it hard to believe that therapy will help. It is important not to feel discouraged when this happens, as these types of setbacks can be quite normal when dealing with depression. These situations provide opportunities to discover new ways to move forward together with the therapist. 

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the child, young person and parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase, because it is vital for the child or young person to become confident in coping with difficult feelings without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress or has completely recovered from depression. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist.

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the counsellor or psychotherapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If they are doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have challenges with depression or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.  

List of useful resources 

Mindsum
To read our information on depression, you can click here to access the link.

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.

Mental health recovery
Mind offers some helpful information on their website on what recovery from a mental illness can look like. You can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to get free advice from our experts

Getting help for anxiety

Getting help for anxiety disorders

Getting help for anxiety disorders 1200 917 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (09:31)

This article covers:

– What types of therapies are involved?

– What types of professionals are involved?

– The journey of recovery from anxiety

What types of therapies are involved?

Psychological therapies are important when treating anxiety disorders. It gives a child or young person the chance to tackle the root of the disorder. There are two therapies that are involved: Cognitive behavioural therapy and exposure therapy. Most of the time, these two therapies are referred to under the same umbrella of cognitive behavioural therapy.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
CBT is a type of talk therapy that focuses on how we think and act and how this affects how we feel. Research has shown that CBT is highly effective for treating different types of anxiety disorders in children and young people. CBT can take anywhere between 6-20 sessions, depending on the severity of the anxiety and the child or young person’s age. CBT for anxiety is a short-term treatment.

The idea behind CBT with children and young people is that they get to talk about their anxiety and learn new skills, which they can use to fight off the anxiety. This all takes place in an environment of safety that the therapist is able to create for the child or young person.

Depending on the child or young person’s age, the therapist will come up with a good way to help them to overcome their anxiety using CBT.

With a young child, the therapist might focus more on changing the behaviours of the child. This is because young children may not be able to really say how they feel and tend to show more behavioural signs of anxiety. With teenagers, the therapist may be able to use similar techniques that are used with adults, focusing on feelings, thoughts and behaviours.

The therapist always finds it useful to involve other family members in the process of treatment. This is because family members also play a part in influencing the child or young person on a day-to-day basis. So, if the therapist can get the family on board, there are greater chances of success.

Exposure therapy
Exposure therapy is a type of behavioural therapy that focuses on helping the child to be exposed to their anxiety until it naturally fades away. Exposure therapy is commonly used as part of CBT. So, it is also a short-term treatment.

Exposure therapy is most helpful for severe and specific anxiety disorders. These include anxiety disorders that cause a great inconvenience in everyday life of the child or young person. For example, having to turn down birthday parties because the child has a fear of balloons. These disorders might include specific phobias, panic disorder, social anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder

The idea behind exposure therapy is that if the child or young person can tolerate the anxious feelings for long enough, they will notice that the anxiety will eventually pass and nothing bad will actually happen.

Depending on the child or young person’s age, the therapist will come up with a good way to help them to face the situations they fear.  

The therapist will expose the child or young person gradually to situations from the least to the most anxiety-provoking.  For example, to help a child with their intense fear of balloons, the therapist might first expose them to pictures and videos of balloons, before they face the real thing.

The child or young person will eventually master each stage and will be able to stop the anxiety from taking over again.

Exposure therapy is a powerful tool for treating anxiety. It also takes a lot of hard work from the child or young person and their parents. The idea of facing a fearful situation might sound daunting, but it is worthwhile if it means that the child or young person can live anxiety-free and their parents can benefit from a peace of mind.

What types of professionals are involved?

There are different professionals that may or may not be involved throughout the treatment process of anxiety for children and young people. These might include counsellors, psychotherapists and doctors/psychiatrist. These terms might be confusing, but the main difference is in the training that each of these professionals have received.  

In the UK, there is not much of a distinction made between counsellor or psychotherapist. Both of these professionals provide therapy. However, there are some slight differences between these two professional terms. These are outlined below.

Counsellors: Counselling is focused on helping people with what they need right now. Compared to psychotherapists, counsellors tend to have had a shorter training, and they help people deal with their issues on a more short-term basis. There may be school-based counsellors available that children and young people can approach at their own school, if they feel they need support with their anxiety. Here at Mindsum, there are counsellors that are available to provide support.

Psychotherapists: Psychotherapy training tends to be longer. Psychotherapists can also give counselling, but their approach to talk-therapy is more in-depth, exploring the history and causes of certain behaviours and emotional issues. The psychotherapist will then treat the anxiety in this specialized way. Here at Mindsum, there are psychotherapists that are available to provide support.

It doesn’t mean that one professional is better than the other. All professionals in this field go through intensive training before they begin to practice. Also, many counsellors seek additional training throughout their careers.

There are also doctors and psychiatrists that can be involved in the treatment of anxiety for children and young people. There are more obvious differences between these two professional terms.

Doctors: These are professionals that are trained in medicine. This will likely be the family GP, who might find it necessary to prescribe certain medications that might help the anxiety, especially if the anxiety is quite severe.

Psychiatrist: These are professionals that are also trained in medicine. However, they also specialized in the field of psychiatry. So they are able to provide consultation and medication for a wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, psychosis, bipolar affective disorder and so on.

The journey of recovery from anxiety

The journey of recovery from anxiety can look different for each child or young person, and depending on the approach that the counsellor or psychotherapist uses. But there are some things that are expected when going through the treatment for anxiety.

Assessment
This is an important phase, where the counsellor or psychotherapist will take the opportunity to get a feel of what is going on with the child or young person. The professional might try to identify the type of anxiety that the child or young person is dealing with, along with other important background information. During this time, the child, young person and/or their parent will be asked important questions that will allow the professional to create a full picture of what is going on.

Therapy sessions
These sessions will take place with a time and regularity that suits the child or young person and their parents. An important aspect of the therapy session is the relationship that the counsellor or psychotherapist will build with the child or young person. This will create a safe space that will encourage them to talk about their fears and anxieties. The child will learn skills that they can use against the anxiety when it comes. Lots of work will be done in the therapy room that will help the child to be more confident to face their anxiety. 

Homework
This can be an important part of treatment for anxiety, especially when having CBT. This is because anxiety is usually experienced in everyday situations in the child or young person’s life. So, specific homework tasks will really help the child or young person to master their anxiety outside of the therapy room. Parents involved in the treatment process might also be asked to help with the homework. Homework success is then discussed in upcoming therapy sessions. 

Progress and setbacks
When having treatment for anxiety, there will be progress and there may also be setbacks. For example, the anxiety might become a little bit worse at one point during the treatment. This might lead the child or young person and their parents to feel like their hard work is not paying off. Setbacks are not bad. In fact, this can be very normal in the recovery process from anxiety. The counsellor or psychotherapist will help to try and find out what might be causing the setback and how to move forward. During the recovery process, setbacks are seen as opportunities to problem-solve.

Ending therapy
The counsellor or psychotherapist will eventually prepare the child, young person and parents for the end of therapy. This is a very important phase because it is vital for the child or young person to ultimately master their anxiety without relying too much on the professional. The end of therapy will take place once the child or young person has made a lot of progress or has completely recovered from the anxiety. The child or young person will leave therapy with many skills that they can use without the help of the therapist. 

Follow up
There might be an agreement with the counsellor or psychotherapist to have a follow-up meeting. This is to check how the child or young person is coping. If the child or young person is doing well, there will be no need for more support. But if they continue to have challenges with their anxiety or any other issues, this will be an opportunity to have extra support.  

List of useful resources

Anxiety
To read our information on anxiety, you can click here to access the link.  

Introduction to counselling and psychotherapy
The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP) have a useful document on different aspects of therapy. To read more, you can click here to access the link.

Anxiety setbacks
Anxiety Care UK offers some advice on their website on some practical steps that can be taken when experiencing setbacks with anxiety. You can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to get free advice from our experts

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety 1200 900 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (08:47)

What is anxiety?

Causes of anxiety

The symptoms of anxiety

Treating anxiety

List of useful resources

How Mindsum can help?

What is anxiety?

Children and young people feel worried and fearful about different things sometimes, which is a normal part of growing up. This is often the case when they are faced with challenging tasks, unfamiliar people and unfamiliar situations.

Anxiety becomes a problem when these worries and fears are so severe and persistent that they start to interfere with normal activities in the child’s everyday life.

For example, on the first day at a new school, all children feel nervous. But some may feel so nervous that they fail to turn up.

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems experienced by young people. But lots of people still suffer in silence. It is important to recognize anxiety and find the right support, so that more serious mental health problems can be prevented.

Causes of anxiety

The cause of anxiety in children and young people is likely due to a combination of different factors. Here are some factors to consider:

  • History of anxiety in the family

  • Being around anxious people

  • Having a stressful experience around a particular situation or object (e.g. social situation, animal, heights, planes)

  • Trauma (e.g. neglect, sexual abuse, accidents, deaths)

  • Big life changes (e.g. moving to a new house, death of a loved one, starting a new school)

  • Situations at home or school (e.g. parents fighting, abuse, bullying, exams)

It is very common for children and young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autism spectrum disorder to suffer from anxiety. 

Depression

Depression

Depression 1024 600 Team Mindsum
Listen to this article (06:05)

What is depression?

Causes of depression

The symptoms of depression

Treating depression

List of useful resources

How Mindsum can help?

What is depression?

Depression is when there is a change in the person’s mood, thoughts and behaviour. The changes in mood typically involve a low mood, but in children and young people this also includes an irritable mood.

 

Depression can be mild, moderate or severe. A mild depression might not stop a child or young person from going about their everyday life. But a moderate or severe depression that stops a child from doing their normal activities is a cause for concern.

 

During severe depression, a child or young person might become overwhelmed by feelings of sadness and worthlessness. For this reason, severe depression can make a child or young person feel suicidal. It is important to recognize these signs so that the right support can be given early on to prevent serious harm.

 

Causes of depression

The cause of depression in children and young people can include a combination of different factors. Here are some factors to consider:

  • A history of depression in the family

  • Conflict or violence at home

  • Pressures at home or at school (e.g. having to take care of a sick relative or having many exams)

  • Big life changes (e.g. parent separation, death of loved one)

  • Trauma, physical or sexual abuse

  • Bullying

  • Chronic illness (e.g. diabetes, asthma, epilepsy, irritable bowel syndrome)

    Your Name *

    Your Email *

      Privacy Preferences

      When you visit our website, it may store information through your browser from specific services, usually in the form of cookies. Here you can change your Privacy preferences. It is worth noting that blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience on our website and the services we are able to offer.

      Click to enable/disable Google Analytics tracking code.
      Click to enable/disable Google Fonts.
      Click to enable/disable Google Maps.
      Click to enable/disable video embeds.
      Our website uses cookies, mainly from 3rd party services. Please confirm, if you agree to our Privacy Preferences and our use of cookies.