Article

About therapy

About Therapy

About Therapy 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 13 August 2021

This article covers:

  • What is therapy?

  • What types of therapies are there?

  • When is therapy needed?

  • How long does therapy last?

  • What does therapy involve?

  • How to get the most out of therapy?

What is therapy?

Therapy refers to a time that you spend talking about your issues and concerns with a mental health professional in a private space. During therapy you work towards the goal of resolving the problem that you have. The problems that can be brought to therapy can include anything from symptoms of a mental illness (e.g., anxiety disorders, depression) to more general life problems (e.g., coping better with school or work).

What types of therapies are there?

There are many different types of therapies out there offered by different therapists .The therapy that is right for you will depend on what type of problem you would like to work on. Different types of problems will require a different approach in therapy. These are the different approaches that therapy might be based on:

Behavioural therapy

This approach to therapy focuses on learning and its impact on certain behaviours. It is often used to eliminate or reduce behaviours that are not helpful for the person. Therapies that fall under this approach include, but are not limited to:

  • Exposure therapy (ET)

  • Applied behavioural analysis (ABA)

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)

  • Dialectical behavioural therapy (DBT)

  • Rational emotive behavioural therapy (REBT)

Cognitive therapy

This approach to therapy focuses on the way people think about different situations and events.  The emphasis here is that negative emotions and unhelpful behaviours develop because of dysfunctional ways of thinking.  By changing thinking patterns, you can change how you feel and behave. An example of a therapy that falls under this approach is the well-known Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

Humanistic therapy

This approach focuses on the individual as a whole.  You are encouraged to think about your feelings and actions so that you can develop a greater sense of responsibility over them. This approach focuses more on self- exploration and self-development than problematic symptoms. Therapies that fall under this approach include, but are not limited to:

  • Gestalt therapy (GT)

  • Person-centred therapy (PCT)

  • Transactional analysis (TA)

  • Transpersonal therapy

Psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapies

This approach focuses on the unconscious mind and the person’s past and how this influences their thoughts, emotions, and behaviours.  These therapies include techniques such as dream analysis, free association,  interpretation and transference to help the client uncover unconscious processes and gain a better understanding of their past and how this affects them in the present.  

Integrative therapy

Therapists that adopt an integrative approach believe that a single type of therapy is not sufficient for helping all clients. Each and every client is different, and therapy needs to be tailored to the individual needs of the client. Therapy will include elements from other approaches to suit the client’s mental, emotional, and physical needs.

The national institute for clinical excellence (NICE) recommends specific therapies for specific problems, although you can still have another form of therapy that is different to the one that is recommended. 

When is therapy needed?

You can seek therapy if you feel like you need to. Some indications that you might need help from a mental health professional can include struggling with your thoughts, emotions, or behaviours to the point that it is difficult for you to function as normal. But this is not always necessary, you do not have to be struggling severely before getting help. It is up to you to decide.  You  you can also discuss this with your GP or a therapist before you begin therapy. 

How long does therapy last?

Most therapy sessions last between 45 minutes to 1 hour. There are some forms of therapy that can take longer.  The frequency of therapy sessions is typically once per week, but some forms of therapy might take place more often each week.

Overall, therapy can span anywhere between a few weeks to years.  This depends on the type of therapy that you are having and the nature of the issue that you bring to therapy.  For example, CBT can take 16 sessions over the course of 16 weeks, whereas going through DBT might take up to 24 weeks to 1 year.

What does therapy involve?

Therapy involves you and the therapist meeting in-person or online to work on an area in your life. For this to happen, therapy involves many different elements.

At the start of therapy, you will be asked different questions and you might fill out certain questionnaires. This phase is often referred to as the initial assessment. Moving forward, the therapist will build a professional relationship with you, where you can feel comfortable to express yourself and share your feelings. There will be work done during sessions and outside of sessions.  You might be assigned homework throughout therapy. As you reach your goals of therapy, sessions will eventually come to an end. The therapist might then schedule a follow-up session to check-in after a period of time. 

How to get the most out of therapy?

To ensure that you get the most of your time with your therapist it might be helpful to keep the following in mind:

  • Try to be clear about what you want- from the beginning of therapy, it is helpful to have an idea of what you would like help with. This will allow both you and the therapist to set clear goals moving forward. Sometimes this is not always straightforward, as you might not yet understand what exactly you need help with. It’s okay if this is the case, you can always explore this together with the therapist.

  • Be honest- the therapist can only help you if they know how you really feel. It is not helpful for you to only say things to please your therapist. Say what you really think and feel. This can get easier as you continue to attend sessions and build relationship with your therapist.

  • Be ready to engage- you will have to make the effort to attend sessions and complete the tasks set by the therapist. The therapist is there to guide and support you and it is up to you to engage with the sessions, so that you can move closer to your goals. This might be difficult to do sometimes, but it will be helpful for you to get the most out of the sessions.

Useful resources  

NHS

You can find useful information about different types of therapies on the NHS website. Click here to read more.

Mind

You can find useful information about different types of therapies on the Mind website. Click here to read more.

The British Association for the Counselling Professions (BACP)

The BACP is a professional body with useful information about types of therapies on their website. Click here to read more.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

Friendship and mental health

Friendship and mental health

Friendship and mental health 1300 731 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 29 July 2021

This article covers:

  • What is friendship?

  • Friendship and mental health

  • What to do  or where to get help?

What is friendship?

A friend is someone other than a relative or partner that you like to talk to and spend time with. Friendship refers to a relationship between two or more friends.

Friendship involves shared positive feelings, closeness, respect, trust, and care for one another. It provides the opportunity to have someone to confide in and do activities such as going out to eat, for a walk, a movie, and attending events.

Friendship can develop in different areas in life, such as at school, work, in the community, within the family, between neighbours and online. Friendships can last for a short period of time or for many years.

Friendships can change overtime, as you grow and experience different situations you might find that your friendships can change overtime. For example, this might be in your level of closeness to friends, your views about friendships and the number of friends you have.

Friendship and mental health

Positive mental health

Friendships are very important for mental health and well-being. There is a lot of research to show that being socially connected promotes mental health and physical health. Having positive friendships can have protective benefits for mental health, that can include:

  • Higher self-esteem

  • Sense of self-worth and belonging

  • Feeling valued and supported

  • Not feeling lonely

  • Improved motivation

  • Positive mood

During difficult times, friends have allowed me to express how I feel with no judgement. They act as a sounding board and help me to think about things from different perspectives. They validate my emotions but also support me in terms of thinking about how to move forward and what might help me – this helps me feel better because I know I’m not alone even when times are extremely difficult.
Katie – Mindsum Peer Support worker

Poor mental health

Just as positive friendships impact mental health, negative friendships can also affect mental health. You might have friends that do not treat you well by behaving in ways that are unhelpful or that leave you feeling bad most of the time. These behaviours might include:

  • Regularly making comments that are hurtful

  • Ignoring you during the times you need their support

  • Reaching out to you only when they want something

  • Not respecting your boundaries

  • Always being in conflict with you and/or others

  • Excluding you on purpose

  • Rarely putting as much effort as you do

These toxic friendships can affect your self-esteem and lead to mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression. If you have friendships like this, you have the power to decide whether or not this needs to change.

Poor mental health can also impact on friendships. Research suggests that higher rates of mental illness is associated with more isolation, loneliness, and social rejection amongst young people. Living with a mental illness can make it difficult for you to cope in social situations or to have the motivation to interact with friends. This can be especially difficult if you struggle with a less common mental illness (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe depression).

If you are struggling in the area of friendship or loneliness, there are different things that you can do that might help. You don’t need to struggle with this alone.

If you don’t have many friends that’s okay. As long as you have a few you can lean on and if not explore how you might make new friends, friends don’t always have to be the people you have known since being young or at school. This might happen by starting volunteering, looking for a part time job and making friends there or joining a new community group.
Katie – Mindsum Peer Support worker

What to do and where to get help

If you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

Here are some things that you can keep in mind that might help you when it comes to friendships:

  • Prioritise healthy friendships – focus on the friends that support you and show that they have your best interest at heart.

  • Resolve conflicts- it is normal to experience conflict in any relationship, including friendships. Learn to deal with conflict through finding healthy and productive ways to move forward.

  • Don’t be too hard on yourself- it doesn’t feel good to struggle in the area of friendships or with loneliness. Many young people don’t like to admit struggling with this and might feel embarrassed about it. In reality, many people including adults struggle with this. So, be gentle with yourself and recognise that building good friendships take time and patience.

  • Join a group or class- if you want to meet new people it is a good idea to join a club or a class, where it is easy to meet and interact with other people. This might include a cooking class, language class, sports group, exercise class, dance club etc. 

  • Frequent places of your interest- choose to spend time in places where you can meet people with the same interests as you. This will improve your chances of being able to connect with new people.

  • Be a good friend too- it is important to try and achieve the same standard you set for others, that way you are more likely to attract friends with the same qualities.

Working with a counsellor or therapist can also help you in improving your confidence and making friends. You can learn practical ways of approaching social situations and improving your relationships with others.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

Useful resources  

NHS

You can read and access resources about friendships on the NHS Children and adolescent mental health service website. Click here to access the link.

Mental Health Foundation

You can read and access resources about friendship and mental health on the Mental Health Foundation website. Click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can read information about helping a friend with their mental health on the Young Minds website. Click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

grief and loss

Grief and loss

Grief and loss 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 29 July 2021

This article covers:

  • What is grief/loss?

  • Grief/loss and mental health

  • With whom or where to get help?

What is grief/loss?

Grief refers to the emotional suffering caused by the loss of something or the death of a loved one. This can include the loss of a job, relationship, house, pet, family member or the diagnosis of an illness.

Feeling distressed in response to a loss is a natural response. Your  mind and body have to process a big change of something or someone not being there anymore, and this can be a complex process that can take time.

There is research to suggest that approximately 92% of young people in the UK will have experienced grief from losing a parent or a pet by the time they turn 16 years old.

During the times of COVID , many people have experienced grief and loss all within a short period of time and the need for social distancing has made it more complex. If you are experiencing grief during the times of COVID, it is likely that it will be more intense and distressing than normal. 

Grief usually includes an intense form of sadness, but it can also involve many different emotional states. This is described in

the well-known theory of the 5 stages of grief by psychiatrist, Kubler-Ross. Not everyone will experience each of these states or necessarily in a specific order. These states include:

1. Disbelief/Denial- Finding it hard to believe and accept the loss and being in a state of shock. You might believe that the news is somehow false or incorrect. This is your mind’s way of protecting you from a flood of intense emotions. It can last hours, days or even longer, but eventually it fades and the healing process can begin.

2. Anger- Feeling angry at others, life, yourself or even at God if you are a person of faith. There is a strong feeling that this loss is extremely unfair. You might ask things like “ why me?” or “why did they deserve to die?”. You might even feel angry at the person who passed away.

3. Bargaining- Attempting to negotiate through the loss or in anticipation of the loss. You might find yourself wondering what you could have done more and asking lots of “what if” questions. This can cause you to struggle with feelings of guilt.

4. Depression- Feelings of extreme low mood and hopelessness is the most common way that people think about grief. You might feel sad, numb, and find it hard to face the world and/or feel quite anxious or fearful. Some people might also have suicidal feelings and struggle to find hope after the loss.

5. Acceptance- This is where you come to terms with the loss through recognising that the thing or person will never come back, and you will be okay. You can start to adjust to the new reality without them. Difficult days will come, but eventually the good days will outnumber the bad days. 

The duration of grief is different for every person. This also depends on factors such as your attachment to the thing or person, your relationship with them and the circumstances surrounding the loss.

It felt as though something was missing, like I had lost some cosmic definition to who I was without this person with me. All I wanted to do was reach out and tell them how I felt, the only person I wanted to talk to about their death was them, but they weren’t there, that took a long time to understand.
Grace – Mindsum Peer Support worker

Grief/Loss and mental health

Grief itself is not a mental illness. Going through extreme distress following a loss is normal. With time the intense feelings of grief become less intense, and you can continue on with life. You might need further support if you continue to struggle with grief and it does not improve after a long period of time.

Some signs that you might not be coping well with grief or experiencing what is known as ‘unresolved’ or ‘complicated grief’ can include:

  • The sense of disbelief that doesn’t gets better with time

  • Constantly thinking about the situation or the person

  • A low mood that doesn’t get better with time

  • Going out of your way to avoid reminders of the situation or person

  • Persistent suicidal thoughts and plans

  • A constant feeling hopelessness that doesn’t get better with time

  • Withdrawing more from others overtime

If you are struggling with feelings of grief, just know that you don’t have to go through it alone. You can choose to reach out to people who are willing to help you get through this difficult process. Reaching out to others including professionals can be very helpful for you, especially if the feelings of grief are not improving overtime.

Where or with whom to get help?

If you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

Here are some things that you can keep in mind that might help you through the process of grief:

Allow yourself to feel

It is important to allow yourself to feel whatever emotions that come up. Some people might try to suppress certain feelings because they might think that it is not right for them to feel certain emotions, but it is normal to go through a mixture of emotions. As you allow yourself to feel, you allow your mind to process the loss and move closer towards healing.

Find ways to speak about the person or event. It helps to acknowledge their existence, the good times as well as the bad. For me, I found writing the person a letter, and making a sketch for them helped me process my thoughts and feelings around their passing.
Grace – Mindsum Peer Support worker

Take extra care of your body

This is the time to be intentional about your self-care. Take extra steps to take care of your physical body. Maintain your daily hygiene and try to engage in some exercise to get your body moving. If it is too hard, you can ask a friend or family member to do it with you. 

Talk to someone

Talking to a loved one about what you are going through can really help during this time. They might not always have the right words to say to make you feel better, but they can listen and just be present with you, so you don’t have to go through it all alone.  

Working with a counsellor or therapist can help you through the difficult feelings of grief, especially if you are having a hard time with it and it is not getting better with time. There are specialist therapies that focus on grief and can allow you to work through and  process the grief in a healthy way.

You can book a free initial consultation with with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

If you would like to get in touch with organisations that provide specialist services for grief, you can visit or contact:

Child Bereavement UK –  a charity that supports children and young people (up to 25 years) and their families when a child is grieving, or when a child dies.

Winston Wish – a charity that provides emotional and practical support for bereaved children, young people, and those who care for them.

Hope Again – is a website for young people going through bereavement which offers support, advice, and signposting to other services.

Useful resources

Young Minds

You can read and access resources about grief/loss on the Young Minds website. Click here to access the link.

Mind

You can read and access resources about bereavement on the Mind website. Click here to access the link.

NHS

You can read useful practical information on getting through grief/loss on the NHS website. Click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

self esteem

Self-esteem

Self-esteem 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 02 July 2021

This article covers:

  • What is Self-esteem?

  • Self-esteem and mental health

  • With whom or where to get help?

What is self-esteem?

Self-esteem refers to your feelings and attitudes towards yourself, in terms of whether you value yourself and feel confident in your abilities. Self-esteem is a broad term that can also involve the sense of competence, self-worth, self-respect, and personal value. 

Throughout your life it is normal to experience times where you have high self-esteem and other times of low self-esteem. This can change depending on your most recent achievements or failures, and interactions with other people.

High self-esteem-Someone with a high self-esteem generally holds positive attitudes towards themselves and are confident in their ability to cope and achieve in different situations, including those that might be challenging. High self-esteem can be influenced by:

  • Growing up with healthy early attachments

  • Being valued and supported by others

  • Being able to cope in difficult situations

  • Being able to think and act independently

  • Taking care of your physical health (e.g., exercising, maintaining a balanced diet)

  • Taking care of your mental health (e.g., taking time off, rewarding yourself, getting help when needed)

 

Always be kind to yourself, recognise that you are you and that is more than enough. You are loved and you are also capable! Be your own authentic self, ‘perfect’ is a construct that doesn’t exist – there is no-one else like you, so get to know yourself and own it.
Sophie – Mindsum Peer Support worker

 

Low self-esteem- Someone with low self-esteem will generally have negative attitudes towards themselves and will tend to have little confidence in their ability to cope and achieve in different situations, especially in those situations that are challenging. Low self-esteem can be influenced by:

  • Harsh criticisms from caregivers

  • Bullying

  • Prejudice, discrimination, or stigma

  • Unsupportive friends and family members

  • Stressful life events

  • Problems at school or work

  • Concerns around your physical appearance

  • Problems with physical or mental health

  • Exposure to unrealistic ideals from social media

Signs that you might have low self-esteem can include:

  • Being harsh or critical about yourself

  • Feeling afraid to be yourself in front of others

  • Putting on a façade around others

  • Believing you are less than others

  • Believing your opinion matters less than others

  • Believing you are somehow flawed

  • Believing you are not good at anything

A person’s self-esteem can also be greater in certain areas (e.g., in sports and arts), compared to other areas (e.g., public speaking).

Self-esteem and mental health

Low self-esteem itself is not a mental illness. Although, persistent problems with self-esteem can lead you to experience problems with your mental health. You might experience mental health problems such as anxiety or depression.

Research has shown that self-esteem is strongly related to depression and anxiety. Having low self-esteem can make a person more vulnerable to develop these mental health issues.

Vice versa, problems with mental health might also influence a person to have low self-esteem. For example, having problems with anxiety can make a person feel so self-conscious, that they might think there is something wrong with them. This can affect self-esteem.

If you are struggling with how you feel about yourself in any way, it is a good idea to take steps to improve this . You don’t have to struggle with your self-esteem for the rest of your life. With time you can build up your self-esteem and feel more confident about yourself and your abilities.

Where or with whom to get help?

If you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can also help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

There are some practical things you can begin to do to improve your self-esteem. This includes:

  • Practicing self-compassion– learn to treat yourself with more kindness by treating and talking to yourself in the same way you would to a good friend.    

 

Speak to yourself with loving and compassionate language rather than language that is self-sabotaging. Learning how to talk to yourself more compassionately is very important. Also, retraining your thinking by recognising and identifying with your strengths. Remind yourself of your strengths on a daily basis, write them down and start putting them into practice to help build self-esteem.
Sophie – Mindsum Peer Support worker

 

  • Challenge negative beliefs/thoughts– take the time to recognise whether those negative thoughts accurately reflect reality or not. Write down the evidence to disprove those negative thoughts and refer back to them.

  • Be more intentional about noticing the positives– write down positive things about yourself, including those that others have said about you. Identify the things that you are good at and the instances in your day to day where you did well. You can refer back to this list whenever you are not feeling good about yourself.

  • Keep healthy relationships– this is very important because who you interact with can have a big impact on how you feel about yourself. Some relationships including friendships, romantic partners and even family members can affect you in a negative way, especially if these people are bullying or abusing you in any way. It is important to prioritise the relationships that help you to feel better about yourself, and not the opposite.

  • Improve your assertiveness– when you struggle with low self-esteem it can be very hard to say no to others. But not being able to say no can make you feel overwhelmed and worse about yourself. Start to stand up for yourself by learning to say no in a respectful way to other people’s demands. This will help you learn to stand your ground, feel more confident and improve your self-esteem.

If you have been struggling with your self-esteem for a long time and/or it is affecting your mental health, it might be helpful for you to speak to a counsellor or therapist. These professionals can help you to work on your self-esteem and tackle the underlying cause of these feelings. You will be able to work towards developing a stronger sense of self-worth that can allow you to move forward with more confidence.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

You can also contact a helpline such as Childline (for under 19s) or The Mix (for under 25s) for support by people who are willing to listen and help you.

Useful resources

Mind

You can access information and useful resources about self-esteem on the Mind website. Click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can access information and useful resources about self-esteem on the Young Minds website. Click here to access the link.

NHS

You can read useful practical information on improving your self-esteem on the NHS website. Click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

Suicidal feelings

Suicidal feelings

Suicidal feelings 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 25 June 2021

This article covers:

  • What are suicidal feelings?

  • Mental health and suicidal feelings

  • With whom or where to get help?

What are suicidal feelings?

Suicide means ending your own life.

Suicidal feelings are ideas of wanting to end your own life or that the world would be better off without you. It could also mean that you have thoughts and ideas about specific methods you can use to end your life.

Some signs that you might be having suicidal feelings can include:

  • Constantly feeling worthless or useless

  • Constant thoughts about your own death

  • Feeling extremely down or depressed

  • Self-harming

  • Not seeing how things could possibly get better

  • Loosing interest in daily life

  • Being tearful and overwhelmed by negative thoughts

What causes suicidal feelings?

Suicidal feelings might be experienced when you are faced with difficult emotions or situations, and it is hard for you to see any way of things getting better. However, many people have also felt this way and were able to come out of it with hope. This means that you can too.

Your life matters, I know it’s difficult to remember that when you’re struggling, but its true. Reach out, talk to family, friends, doctors, teachers, anyone – you deserve to be happy, and you’re not alone with your emotions.
Roan- Mindsum Peer Support Worker


Some factors that can increase the risk of suicidal feelings can include:

  • Existing mental health issues

  • Socioeconomic issues (e.g., money problems, homelessness)

  • Bullying and discrimination (e.g., among LGBTQ+ community, refugees, migrants)

  • Social isolation

  • Loosing someone by suicide

  • Stressful life events (e.g., relationship breakup, abuse, domestic violence)

  • Long-term physical pain or other health problems

  • Addiction or substance abuse

  • During pregnancy or after childbirth

  • Involvement with the criminal justice system (e.g., prison)

  • Previous attempts of suicide

Research continues to show that men have higher rates of suicide compared to women.

Mental health and suicidal feelings

Suicide itself is not a mental disorder. However, people with mental disorders are at a greater risk of experiencing suicidal feelings and behaviours. These mental health disorders can include:

  • Depression

  • Bipolar disorder

  • Psychosis

  • Schizophrenia

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder

  • Eating disorders

  • Personality disorders

These mental disorders can cause a person to have intense difficulties with their thoughts and emotions, which can get overwhelming and can lead to difficulties in thinking clearly or to a sense that there is no hope. The person might then experience suicidal feelings.

If you are having thoughts and feelings about suicide, it is a good idea to get support as soon as possible. The earlier you talk to someone, the earlier you can get some relief from those feelings. You might not be convinced that anything can help, but it is better to try to speak to someone you trust about what is going on. You might even be surprised at how helpful this can be.

Music and poetry were big parts of my recovery, I know it’s not a long-term solution, but reminding yourself of the things you love is so calming in the moment when you’re really struggling, the littlest things could make all the difference, there’s nothing too small as long as it helps.
Roan- Mindsum Peer Support worker


With whom or where to get help
 

If you are feeling unsafe because you want to hurt yourself, this is a mental health emergency. Please call 999 as soon as possible or go to your nearest Accident and Emergency department. Here are some organisations who can help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

Talk to someone you trust and let them know how you’ve been feeling. You might do this by letting a trusted adult know what is happening. This might include a friend, your teacher, school counsellor, parent, or a medical doctor.

Talk to your GP. They will be able to give you support (e.g., prescribing medication) or they can refer you to specialist services that are appropriate for what you need (e.g., talking therapy). If you do not have a GP or you’re not sure what to do, you can call the non-emergency NHS 111 helpline.

Working with a mental health professional can help you to tackle the cause of why you might be having suicidal feelings. You can learn valuable coping skills that can allow you to have long-term relief from these difficult feelings and find hope for the future. You might also develop what is called a ‘crisis plan’ with a professional, which will include certain steps you can follow when you are feeling suicidal.

If you are not currently experiencing a mental health emergency, you can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you are not currently experiencing a mental health emergency and you also don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers. They have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

You can also contact available helplines such as The Samaritans, HOPELINEUK (for anyone under 35 years old experiencing suicidal feelings), Childline (for under 19s) or The Mix (for under 25s), for support by people who are willing to listen and help you. 

Useful resources

NHS

You can find practical advice about what to do if you are feeling suicidal on the NHS website. Click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can read and access resources about suicidal feelings on the Young Minds website. Click here to access the link.

Mind

You can read and access useful resources about suicidal feelings on the Mind website. Click here to access the link.

Click here to book free support sessions

 

Sexuality and mental health

Sexuality and mental health

Sexuality and mental health 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 25 June 2021

This article covers:

  • What is Sexuality?

  • Sexuality and mental health

  • With whom or where to get support?

What is Sexuality?

Sexuality refers to a person’s sexual feelings towards other people. This is often also referred to as sexual orientation, which describes whether a person is attracted to the same sex or a different sex. It is not about who you have sex with or how often you have sex.

Sexuality is something that is highly personal for most people. If you are not sure about your sexuality, that’s okay. It can take time for you to understand this about yourself.

Sexuality can also change over time.

There are different terms used to describe sexuality or sexual orientation. These include:

  • Straight – attraction to the opposite sex.

  • Gay– a man’s attraction to the same sex.

  • Lesbian– a woman’s attraction to the same sex.

  • Bisexual– attraction to more than one sex or gender. Some people might prefer the term Pansexual, which means attraction to different types of people, not depending on sex or gender identity.

  • Asexual– not having an attraction to anyone.

  • Queer– an umbrella term for anyone who is not straight or cisgender, who might not want to take on any specific labels for their sexual orientation or gender identity. 

There are many related terms not covered in this article, which you can find in the Stonewall list of terms. To read our information on the topic, you can view our page on LGBTQ+ and mental health and Gender and mental health.

Some people might feel like they don’t fit in with certain labels, which is also okay. Your sexuality is not something that needs to be set in stone.

It’s normal to feel confused about your sexuality, and It can be daunting not knowing how you feel or worrying about how people will react, but sexuality is not a choice. Everyone has the right to be themselves without the fear of judgement.
Sarah- Mindsum Peer Support Worker


Sexuality and mental health

Positive mental health

Embracing your sexuality and being proud of it can have a positive and powerful impact on your mental health. This can help you to feel:

  • More at ease

  • More confident

  • More authentic

  • A sense of relief

  • A sense of community and belonging

  • A sense of freedom for you to express yourself

  • A sense of improved relationships with loved ones

According to research, family acceptance of LGBT young people is associated with greater self-esteem, social support and better physical health among the young people. 

Poor mental health

People of any sexuality can suffer from poor mental health.

However, those who identify with a sexuality other than straight can sometimes face certain stressors that can lead to mental health issues. These stressors can include:

  • Personal uncertainty

  • Feeling different from others

  • Feeling afraid to come out

  • Prejudice and discrimination

  • Homophobia

  • Biphobia

  • Rejection

  • Harassment, bullying, victimisation

Research suggests that people who identify as LGBTQ+ commonly struggle with mental health issues such as:

  • Depression

  • Anxiety

  • Low self-esteem

  • Suicide

  • Self-harm

  • Substance abuse

According to a recent research by Stonewall in the UK, people who identified as bisexual were less likely to come out to others due to fear of discrimination. Data also suggested that bi people suffered more with mental health issues, compared to gays and lesbians.

Those who identify as bisexual might be more vulnerable to poor mental health because they can face discrimination both outside and within the LGBTQ+ community.  This might cause feelings of isolation and rejection, as they might not know where to turn.

No matter your sexuality, if you are struggling with your mental health,  it is a good idea to find support as soon as you can. 

Your sexuality is a part of you, It doesn’t define who you are. Just be yourself and everything will fall into place.
Sarah- Mindsum Peer Support Worker 


With whom and where to get help?

If you are in immediate danger or you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can also help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

You do not have to struggle alone. Talk to someone you trust and let them know what is going on. They can listen and help you as you get more support. This might include talking to a friend, parent, teacher, or school counsellor.

You can also talk to your GP and let them know what is going on. They will be able to give you support or refer you to the right services for the type of support that you need.

Working with a counsellor or therapist can help you to work through difficult feelings, relationships, and many other challenges that you might be experiencing. You can choose to work with an LGBTQ+ therapist, although not all services can guarantee a match with an LGBTQ+ therapist.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

If you would like to get in touch with organisations that provide support services for the LGBTQ+ community, you can contact:

Gendered Intelligence– a charity led by trans people to increase understanding of gender diversity and to help other trans people (under 25 years old) to live better lives.

LGBT Foundation– a national charity in the Manchester area that offers services and resources for trans people.

Mermaids UK– a charity supporting gender-diverse young people and families.

MindOut– a mental health charity led by LGBTQ+ people to improve the mental health and well-being of other LGBTQ+ people through offering various services, such as peer support advice, support groups, counselling and more.

Stonewall–  a charity that offers help and advice for LGBTQ+ people and their loved ones.

The Proud Trust– a charity that uses guidance and information to help children over the age of 12 years old to answer any questions they might have regarding their sexuality, gender or identity.

List of useful resources

Young Minds

You can read information about sexuality and mental health on the Young Minds website. You can click here to access the link.

Mind

You can also read information about LGBTQ+ and mental health on the Mind website. You can click here to access the link.

Rethink Mental Illness

You can read information about LGBT mental health on the Rethink Mental Illness website. You can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

Parents and LGBTQ+

Parents: Supporting LGBTQ+ children

Parents: Supporting LGBTQ+ children 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 17 June 2021

As a parent, it is normal if you have questions or concerns about your child that you know or think might be lesbian, gay, bi, trans or any other way. Getting answers to these questions can allow you to better understand the identity and preferences of your child and how to support them moving forward.

How you respond to your child who identifies as LGBTQ+  can have a positive or negative impact on their development and well-being. Below is some guidance on ways to support your child who identifies as LGBTQ+.

Understand LGBTQ+

It is a good idea to research and read as much information about LGBTQ+ as you can. Today there are many different terms used when describing sexual orientation and gender identity, which can be overwhelming.

Take your time to understand LGBTQ+ and what it means. This will help you to understand your child better and be sensitive to what they might be experiencing and how they might identify.

For a full list of terms related to LGBTQ+, you can access the Stonewall list of terms. To read our information on the topic, you can view our page on LGBTQ+ and mental health and Gender and mental health.

Provide a safe space

It is more helpful if you could set your feelings aside and simply provide a safe space for your child. By letting them know that you are always there to listen and help them with whatever it is they are going through. They will likely feel more comfortable to approach you and let you know what they are experiencing if you take this approach.

Avoid forcing or confronting

You might feel the need to ask them about personal details directly, which might not always be helpful. For many young people, figuring out who they are and going through different experiences can be scary and confusing. It is never a good idea to force your child to do or be someone they are not. This can be damaging to their well-being.

Appreciate their bravery for coming out

If your child took the step of coming out to you, it likely took a lot of courage and bravery. This can be a very stressful and nerve-wracking step for many young people. Responding with love and acceptance is important for your child’s mental health and well-being.

According to research, family acceptance of LGBT young people is associated with greater self-esteem, social support and better physical health among the young people.

Let them know they are loved

No matter how you feel about their sexual orientation or gender identity it is important to remind them that they are loved. This is very important, as treating a child differently might lead them to think that there is something wrong with them. Especially in a society where those who identify as LGBTQ+ can face prejudice and discrimination,  it is important to remind them that they are still valuable and worthy.

Be involved in their lives

Try to stay involved with your child in different areas in their life, such as at school, in relationships and at home. You will be in a better position to recognise when they might be struggling and need your help. As a parent who wants the best for their child, you will be able to support them closely and be involved in the decisions they take. Being involved will allow you to recognize when things are not going well and when to intervene.

Encourage healthy relationships

As with all children, it is important to educate them about healthy relationships. Teach them about safe and potentially toxic relationships. Inform them on what they need to know to make the best choices in relationships and avoid those that can be harmful. In the long term, this can help to preserve their mental health.

Stand up against bullying

Be an ally and stand up against bullying and discrimination against your child and the LGBTQ+ community as a whole. No one deserves to be treated differently because of who they are and how they want to identify. Standing up against bullying will let your child know that you are on their side.

Know what NOT to do

Be sensitive to your child and their feelings. Avoid doing or saying things that could potentially affect how they feel and cause them to feel like it is unsafe to be themselves. This might include:

  • Trying to force them to change their sexual orientation or gender identity

  • Suggesting that it is just a phase, or they will grow out of it

  • Saying things like “I could tell” when they come out, which can make them feel embarrassed

  • Asking if they are “sure”, which can make them confused and doubtful about their identity

  • Discriminating against others in the LGBTQ+ community

  • Communicating your disapproval about their sexual orientation or gender identity

Know that you are not alone

It is important to know that you are not alone in this experience. There are many other families with an LGBTQ+ relative, who will have shared the same experiences as you. Above all, as you go through this process and learn more, take the time to build a healthy relationship with your child so that they feel safe to simply be themselves and share anything with you.

Useful resources

Children 1st UK

You can find advice about supporting LGBT children on the Children 1st Website. You can click here to access the link.

The BeYou project

You can find advice about supporting LGBT+ children on The BeYou project website. You can click here to access the link.

Family Lives UK

You can find advice about supporting LGBTQ children on the Family Lives website. You can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

 

Gender and mental health

Gender and mental health

Gender and mental health 1200 800 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 14 June 2021

This article covers:

  • What is Gender identity?

  • Gender identity and mental health

  • With whom or where to get support?

What is Gender Identity?

Gender identity refers to what you believe your gender is. You might identify as a man, woman, transgender, gender fluid, non-binary, or any other way.

Gender identity is not related to biological sex. Your sex is based on physical and biological body parts, such as the penis, vagina, breasts, and hormones.

Sometimes your gender identity can match your body and sometimes it does not.  With time and as you explore you can decide that you identify with a certain gender. This can happen at any point in life. 

There are many related terms not covered in this article, which you can find in the Stonewall list of terms. But some terms that are commonly referred to when describing gender identity include:

Cisgender- Refers to someone who identifies as the same gender assigned to them at birth.

Transgender- Refers to someone who identifies with a gender that is different from the one assigned from their sex at birth.

Gender queer/non-binary/gender fluid- Refers to someone who identifies with male or female, or a combination of both, which can change at any given time, depending on how they feel.

Intersex- Refers to someone who is born with sexual or reproductive organs that doesn’t fit with the typical male or female anatomy, or with chromosomes/hormones that do not match with their organs, and in rare cases born with both male and female reproductive organs.

You might also prefer for others to refer to you with certain pronouns, such as “she”, “him”, “them” or “they”.

It is becoming more common for people to think of gender as a spectrum. Some might feel like they don’t fit in with certain labels and can experience gender in a fluid and fluctuating way. Therefore, gender identity labels should not be set in stone.

Trans and gender-diverse people is the term that is commonly used to refer to those who identify with a different gender from the one assigned to them at birth.

“It might take time to understand your identity, you may even change your mind a few times. I came out as non-binary when I was 15, it was scary, but staying true to myself was important to me, just be safe, and love yourself, you’re valid.”

Roan – Mindsum Peer Support Worker


Gender identity and mental health

Positive mental health

Identifying as trans or gender-diverse does not always mean that you suffer from mental health issues. Embracing and being proud of your identity can have a positive and powerful impact on your mental health. This can help you to feel:

  • More at ease

  • More confident

  • More authentic

  • A sense of relief

  • A sense of community and belonging

  • A sense of freedom for you to express yourself

  • A sense of improved relationships with loved ones

Poor mental health

Due to the type of stressors that trans and gender-diverse people can go through, there is a risk of experiencing mental health issues. These stressors can include:

  • Prejudice and discrimination

  • Transphobia

  • Rejection

  • Harassment, bullying, victimisation

Research shows that these types of stressors can influence trans and gender-diverse people to have problems with self-esteem, body-image and low satisfaction with life. Other problems can include:

  • Low self-esteem

  • Problems with anger

  • Social withdrawal/isolation

  • Depression, anxiety

  • Self-harm or suicidal feelings

Mental health problems might also be experienced due to something called Gender dysphoria. This is when the person feels extremely uncomfortable because they feel that their biological sex does not match their gender identity. Sometimes this feeling can be so overwhelming that it leads to issues that can include:

  • Depression/anxiety

  • Low self-esteem

  • Social withdrawal/isolation

  • Neglecting of self

If you are experiencing any issues with your mental health, including gender dysphoria, it is a good idea to find support as soon as you can.

“You are not alone. There are millions out there experiencing a gender Identity awakening and many more who are supportive and willing to listen and help you to the best of their abilities. There is nothing wrong with you for feeling the way you do. Your Identity is a part of you, not something that is ‘wrong’. You should never put yourself down for how you want to be seen and referred to as.”

Soroush – Mindsum Peer Support Worker


With whom or where to get help?

If you are in immediate danger or you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can also help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

You do not have to struggle alone. Talk to someone you trust and let them know what is going on. They can listen to you and help you as you get more support. This might include talking to a friend, parent, teacher, or school counsellor.

You can also talk to your GP and let them know what is happening. They will be able to refer you to the right services for the type of support that you need.

Working with a counsellor or therapist can help you to work through difficult feelings, relationships, and many other challenges that you might be experiencing. You can choose to work with an LGBTQ+ therapist, although not all services can guarantee a match with an LGBTQ+ therapist.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

If you would like to get in touch with organisations that provide support services for the LGBTQ+, trans and non-binary community, you can contact:

Gendered Intelligence– a charity led by trans people to increase understanding of gender diversity and to help other trans people (under 25 years old) to live better lives.

LGBT Foundation– a national charity in the Manchester area that offers services and resources for trans people.

Mermaids UK– a charity supporting gender-diverse young people and families.

MindOut– a mental health charity led by LGBTQ+ people to improve the mental health and well-being of other LGBTQ+ people through offering various services, such as peer support advice, support groups, counselling and more.

Midline Trans+ – By calling 0300 330 5468, transgender, agender, gender fluid and non-binary individuals can get free support. The line operates on Monday’s and Fridays from 20:00 – 24:00.

Stonewall–  a charity who offer help and advice for LGBTQ+ people and their loved ones.

The Proud Trust– a charity that uses guidance and information to help children over the age of 12 years old to answer any questions they might have regarding their sexuality, gender or identity.

NHS list of Gender Dysphoria Clinics (GDCs)– a list of GDCs offered by the NHS can be found on their website. This list can give you the information needed when speaking to your GP, who can make a referral to a clinic. 

Useful resources

NHS

You can read more information about gender dysphoria on the NHS website. You can click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can read information about gender and mental health on the Young Minds website. You can click here to access the link.

Mental Health Foundation
You can read information including research on gender identity issues and mental health on the Mental Health Foundation website. You can click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

self-harm

Self-harm

Self-harm 1200 893 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 09 June 2021

This article covers:

  • What is Self-harm?

  • Self-harm and mental health

  • With whom or where to get help?

What is self-harm?

Self-harm is not easy to talk about, but it is helpful to learn as much as possible about it. Self-harm refers to when a person causes deliberate injury or damage to any part of their own body.  This can include:

  • Hitting, cutting, burning, pinching, skin picking

  • Ingestion of poisonous chemicals (e.g., tablets/toxins)

  • Binge eating or starvation

  • Misuse of alcohol and drugs

  • Excessive exercise or exercising despite injuries

Who self-harms?

Self-harm can affect anyone. Although, according to research it is very common in adolescence with approximately 10% of young people self-harming.

Others that are likely to self-harm can include those:

  • with experience of a mental health disorder

  • with substance abuse-related issues

  • that are part of the LGBTQ+ community

  • that are in prison

  • that are an asylum seeker

  • that lost someone by suicide

  • that survived any form of abuse

Why self-harm?

There are different reasons why a person might self-harm. Some might self-harm because of something painful that happened in the past and or due to a present situation. Others might self-harm without a clear reason why they do so.

Some common reasons for self-harming can include:

  • To change emotional pain into physical pain

  • To reduce overwhelming feelings

  • A sense of being in control

  • As a form of self-punishment

  • To turn unseen thoughts and emotions to something visible

  • To express feelings that are hard to put into words

  • To stop feeling numb and disconnected

  • To express suicidal feelings without going through with it.

It is important to know that self-harm is only a temporary way of finding relief. If you continue to self-harm, you can become trapped in a negative cycle of turning to self-harm whenever things get difficult.

The best way to find long-term relief is to learn more helpful and productive strategies of coping with difficult feelings or situations.

“You have to want to stop for yourself, nobody can make you, you have to recognise your worth and the wonderful influence you have, in the meantime, keep any wounds clean, and any items used sterile, use aftercare (like aloe vera) to limit scarring throughout the healing process.”

Roan – Mindsum Peer Support Worker


Self-harm and mental health

Self-harm itself is not a mental illness. But the behaviour of self-harming suggests that the person has unhelpful ways of coping.

Self-harm can be related to mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Self-harm does not always mean that the person wants to end their life. It is a way through which the person chooses to cope with certain feelings or situations. However, sometimes self-harm might increase the risk of experiencing suicidal feelings.

Self-harm should always be taken seriously, which is why it is important to find the appropriate treatment to help the person replace self-harming behaviours with more helpful coping strategies.

“Prevention is key. Notice when the feelings begin and remove yourself from the situation. Small changes make a big difference and every little thing you can do helps to prevent the emotional intensity from building. I had to learn to be compassionate towards myself by giving myself time to practice self-care and stop doing things which caused me unnecessary stress.”

Alice – Mindsum Peer Support Worker


With whom or where to get help?

If you are feeling the need to hurt yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible or go to your nearest Accident and Emergency department. Here are some organisations who can help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

One of the first steps to getting help is to tell someone. You don’t have to suffer alone. You might do this by letting a trusted adult know what is happening. This might include your teacher, school counsellor, parent, or a medical doctor.

Working with a counsellor or therapist can help you to work on the things that cause you to feel overwhelmed and develop valuable coping skills without having to self-harm.  Working with a professional can help you to break the cycle of self-harm and prevent it from becoming a serious problem in your life.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained Peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

You can also contact available helplines such as Childline (for under 19s) or The Mix (for under 25s), for support by people who are willing to listen and help you. 

Useful resources

Self Harm UK

You can read and access useful resources for young people about self-harm on the Self Harm UK website. Click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can read and access resources about self-harm on the Young Minds website. Click here to access the link.

Mind

You can read and access useful resources about self-harm on the Mind website. Click here to access the link.

 

Click here to book free support sessions

LGBTQ+ and mental health

LGBTQ+ and mental health

LGBTQ+ and mental health 1200 801 Team Mindsum
Last updated: 29 May 2021

This article covers:

  • What does LGBTQ+ mean?

  • LGBTQ+ and mental health

  • What support is available?

What does LGBTQ+ mean?

LGBTQ+ is considered as an umbrella term for the gay community. It is an acronym that refers to anyone who is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and anyone who might be questioning. The + sign is included for any other way that a person might define their gender or sexuality.

There are many other related terms not covered in this article, which you can find in the Stonewall list of terms.

According to the last survey by the Office for National Statistics, there has been an increase in those identifying as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) from 1.5% to 2.0%  between 2012 and 2017. Also, young people between the ages of 16-24 years were most likely to identify as LGB in 2017.

Coming out as bisexual affected me in a positive way because I felt more at ease with my emotions and free to think and feel how I wanted, but also affected me negatively because my family members don’t really approve, and this made me feel quite alone as I am the only member of my family who is in the LGBTQ+ community.
Addison – Mindsum Peer Support Worker

LGBTQ+ and mental health

Positive mental health

Identifying as LGBTQ+ does not always mean that you also suffer from mental health issues. Embracing and being proud of your identity as LGBTQ+ can have a positive and powerful impact on your mental health. This can help you to feel:

  • More at ease

  • More confident

  • More authentic

  • A sense of relief

  • A sense of community and belonging

  • A sense of freedom for you to express yourself

  • A sense of improved relationships with loved ones

Poor mental health

Although due to the type of stressors that the LGBTQ+ community can come into contact with, it is common for people who identify as LGBTQ+ to struggle with their mental health. These types of stressors can include:

  • Homophobia

  • Transphobia

  • Biphobia

  • Prejudice and discrimination

  • Rejection

  • Isolation

  • Fear of coming out

It is extremely upsetting for any person to experience hate and discrimination because of an aspect of who they are. Because of fear, the person might also miss out on certain things, such as access to appropriate health care, which in itself might also affect mental health.

The latest study in 2018 by Stonewall found that 1 in 7 people surveyed who identified as LGBTQ+ avoided healthcare treatment out of fear of discrimination.

The survey and research overall suggest that people who identify as LGBTQ+ commonly struggle with mental health issues such as:

  • Depression

  • Anxiety

  • Low self-esteem

  • Suicide

  • Self-harm

  • Substance abuse

You might experience different challenges compared to others in the LGBTQ+ community, which can also depend on other aspects of your identity. This might include your age, ethnicity, cultural background, religion, physical abilities, and other characteristics.

No matter what your challenging experience might be, it is important to seek help where you can, especially if you are struggling with your mental health.  

What most helped me to come out in general was the fact that there are more people in the LGBTQ+ community now than ever before, and with all the support they are getting and how they would have made me feel comfortable with joining the community it gave me great relief and more confident with the choice of coming.
Addison – Mindsum Peer Support Worker

What support is available?

If you are in immediate danger or you are struggling to the point that you are having thoughts of hurting yourself, please call 999 as soon as possible. Here are some organisations who can also help you 24/7 if you need urgent help.

Working with a counsellor or therapist can help you to work through difficult feelings, relationships, and many other challenges that you might be experiencing. You can choose to work with an LGBTQ+ therapist, although not all services can guarantee a match with an LGBTQ+ therapist. You can find a list of organisations below, who might be able to help with this.

You can book a free initial consultation with a qualified mental health professional through our online service.

If you don’t feel ready to speak to a therapist, you can book a free call with one of our trained peer support workers, who have personal experience of coping with difficult feelings and are willing to guide and support you.

The thing I most found helpful is talking to someone. I talked to some of my friends and with their support it helped me come out to my family and accept myself within, knowing they would also be there to help me. And if you don’t have anyone to talk to, there are mental health websites where you can talk privately to a professional. Talking about issues deep in your head is the best way to get it out and more clearly.
Addison – Mindsum Peer Support Worker

If you would like to get in touch with organisations that provide support services for people who identify as LGBTQ+, you can contact:

MindOut– a mental health charity led by LGBTQ+ people to improve the mental health and well-being of other LGBTQ+ people through offering various services, such as peer support advice, support groups, counselling  and more.

Stonewall–  a charity who offer help and advice for LGBTQ+ people and their loved ones.

Albert Kennedy Trust– a charity who offer support for LGBTQ+ young people between the ages of 16-24 years.

Imaan– a charity that supports LGBTQ+ Muslims through online forums, where you can share and connect with others and ask for support.

Gendered Intelligence– a charity led by trans people to increase understanding of gender diversity and to help other trans people (under 25 years old) to live better lives.

LGBT Consortium– a platform that offers a database of existing LGBTQ+ groups, services, and organisations, which you can also search for based on location.

Useful resources

Mind

You can also read information about LGBTQ+ and mental health on the Mind website. You can click here to access the link.

Young Minds

You can read information about sexuality and mental health on the Young Minds website. You can click here to access the link.

Rethink Mental Illness

You can read information about LGBT mental health on the Rethink Mental Illness website. You can click here to access the link.

Click here to book free support sessions

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